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WWF launches Wildlife Campaign to help nature survive the Corona crisis - Powered By Achilles and the tortoise

 

The crisis broke people out of their daily routines. The world stopped for a minute and it seemed like nature could breathe again. But for many wildlife species this was not the case. Illegal wildlife trafficking has not stopped. In fact, it has increased as their protection is lost in these times of crisis.

 

WWF and Achilles and the Tortoise have joined forces to support community-rangers, so that they can continue to actively protect wildlife. The Pangolin is the face of this wildlife campaign. This majestic creature is tired of being trafficked and killed for bullshit medicines. That’s why the pangolins stand up and fight. Wildlife poaching must stop!

 

By buying a WWF x Achilles and the Tortoise Pangolin t-shirt or protection social mask, you contribute to the detecting of illegal markets and trade routes and catching wildlife criminals. Show your support and buy one of the campaign items here.

 

These are not proprietary Achilles and the Tortoise products, but we are proud to contribute to this great initiative by providing the designs!

 

Achilles and the Tortoise

A label intent on creating standout pieces for the urban and streetwear customer.

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Amur Leopard

Our first collection represents the Amur Leopard. This beautiful animal lives in Sikhote-Alin, a mountain range in the Russian Far East. Today, there are estimated to be around 50 – 90 Amur Leopards left in the wild. Buying an Amur Leopard garment means aiding in the survival of the rarest ‘cat’ in the world. 

Go to the shop to buy an item from the Amur Leopard collection.


Pangolins

 

Pangolins are the world’s most trafficked mammals and are thereby pushed to extinction. Follow our Instagram for new designs and learn how we can help these rare creatures.

 

Forestation

People have always underestimated the importance of healthy forests. They keep our climate stable. They are the world’s second-largest storehouse of carbon dioxide, after oceans. Forests release oxygen, regulate our water supply and improve its quality. They also provide habitat to more than half of the world’s land-based species. Sadly human impact has already led to the loss of around 40% of the world’s forests. And today, an area the size of a football pitch is still being destroyed every second.

In collaboration with WWF, Achilles and the Tortoise will soon launch the Basics Collection, which will be dedicated to flourishing forests.

African Wild Dog

The African wild dog is one of the world’s most endangered mammals. The largest populations remain in southern Africa and the southern part of East Africa. Wild dogs are social and gather in packs of around ten individuals, but some packs number more than 40. They are opportunistic predators that hunt medium-sized ruminants, such as gazelles. In a sprint, African wild dogs can reach speeds of more than 44 miles per hour.

The principal threat to African Wild Dogs is habitat fragmentation, which increases their contact with people and domestic animals, resulting in human-wildlife conflict and transmission of infectious disease.

Achilles and the Tortoise, Anthroe and WWF combine forces in this project. With this project we contribute to creating protected areas and protecting major wildlife corridors, because they benefit species such as the African wild dog.

Sumatra: Rhino, Elephant, Tiger & Orangutan

With more than 50 million inhabitants Sumatra belongs to the biggest islands in the world. It holds some of the richest and diverse tropical forests of the planet. These forests produce drinking water, natural resources for livelihood and play an important part in the local culture. It’s also the only place on earth where the Rhino, Elephant, Tiger and Orangutan live together.

But these creatures are critically endangered as poachers hunt them for their skin and horns and catch them for entertainment and tourism purposes. Their forest homes are destroyed by commercial or illegal logging and being cut down to make way for palm oil plantations. There are fewer than 300 Sumatran Rhinos and fewer than 400 Sumatran Tigers in the wild!

Achilles and the Tortoise and Luwies started a collaboration to develop circular produced lifestyle items and help restore the habitat of the Sumatra Rhino, Elephant, Orangutan and Tiger.

Production

Our products are carefully designed to look great and last
longer. We have gone to lengths to ensure our clothes are fully organic and GOTS certified. This means:

 

NO TOXIC CHEMICALS
NO WASTED WATER
NO CHILD LABOUR
AND FAIR WAGES

Limited supply

We are demand-driven and produce in batches, so as to never overproduce. We will only produce a new batch when it is already sold. All items are tagged and labelled individually, making every item you own unique.

Transport

Unfortunately, we are not able to change everything. Sustainable transport is still impossible, thus we compensate for the CO2 emitted throughout transport.

Rule of Thirds

Transparency and accountability are incredibly important to us. Therefore we operate on what we call ‘The Rule of Thirds’. It means that the pricing of all Achilles and the Tortoise products will be as follows:

  • 1/3 production costs
  • 1/3 charitable cause
  • 1/3 reinvestment & profit

Giving back

By buying Achilles and the Tortoise items you invest in the world. Every product you will ever buy will be linked to a specific area in nature. A large part of the profit will be donated to a carefully selected cause that tries to return this area to its former glory.

Story

Achilles and the Tortoise wants to show the world the true price of clothing and demonstrate that ethics can be associated with high-quality streetwear.

 

Our mission is to transform the clothing industry – because of its negative impact as a result of excessive pollution, unsold stock, gruesome working conditions – and at the same time enhance natural biodiversity. We have developed a new, regenerative business model: ‘The Rule of Thirds.’ The Rule of Thirds determines the price of a product using a clear formula: one third covers circular production costs, one third is invested in specific projects to restore biodiversity, and the last part is profit and reinvestment.

 

With this business model, we want to encourage other organizations to review their business operations and inspire them to strive towards an economic balance where they value economic profits, the wellbeing of people and nature conservation equally.

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